Neon GTO Comparison & Capacitance Tutorial (Public Thread)
3 3

3 posts in this topic

Capacitance Tutorial

By:Telford Dorr

Direct Tutorial Link for Board Patrons & Board Vendors

Updated 8/22/09

This is a tutorial on a basic comparison on Neon GTO cable products put our by various manufacturers and how they compare to one another. How capacitance differs in various solid conduits but most importantly what toll they can put on your transformers. Video demonstrations to neon transformers reactions to loads of neon filled lamps, Hg filled lamps, and heavy capacitive loads

Included are some basic charts and video demo's of my trip over to Telford Dorr's Laboratory with samples of various GTO products. A big thank you to Telford, it was a big joy to come over, spend a few hours learning a great deal and having some good conversation.

We will update and revise this tutorial with information as we get it

Manufacturers used for this comparison

  • Tecnolux
  • Transco
  • Neon Power Pro
  • Tuf-hide

Capacitance Video Demonstration

Still%203.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool video you guys put together, but you won't get me anywhere near that stuff!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cool video you guys put together, but you won't get me anywhere near that stuff!

Actually, it's not all that dangerous, if you're conscientious and careful. You notice I use a switch-box, in plain sight and away from everything else, to control the power? Also, note that I'm standing at the end of the table, well away from anything energized, with empty space behind me. Also note that I unplug the trannie power test cord if I'm going to lean over the table to make a wiring change. Also note that the 3-wire power test cord has ring terminals crimped onto the wires so that they can't accidentally come off of the trannie, and that the trannie is grounded.

Erik's view from the side of the table makes it look way more dangerous than it actually is.

Working with electricity can be as safe or as dangerous as one chooses to make it.

It's kinda like inspecting the running engine of your car - you want to avoid sticking your hand into the fan...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
3 3